Following Friday...

this is lovely. lovely. lovely

Once we were blobs in the sea, and then fishes, and then lizards and rats and then monkeys, and hundreds of things in between. This hand was once a fin, this hand once had claws! In my human mouth I have the pointy teeth of a wolf and the chisel teeth of a rabbit and the grinding teeth of a cow! Our blood is as salty as the sea we used to live in! When we’re frightened, the hair on our skin stands up, just like it did when we had fur. We are history! Everything we’ve ever been on the way to becoming us, we still are.

I’m made up of the memories of my parents and my grandparents, all my ancestors. They’re in the way I look, in the colour of my hair. And I’m made up of everyone I’ve ever met who’s changed the way I think.

Terry Pratchett (via we-are-star-stuff)
Bring me the sunset in a cup.
Emily Dickinson (via mythologyofblue)
haaaaaaaaave-you-met-ted:

j-willikers:

wicked-mint-leaves:

kateevangelistaauthor:

This is SO cool that I just had to share.

you clever fuckers

my teacher used this today

W+H+I+S+K+E+Y23+8+9+19+11+5+25 = 100%

haaaaaaaaave-you-met-ted:

j-willikers:

wicked-mint-leaves:

kateevangelistaauthor:

This is SO cool that I just had to share.

you clever fuckers

my teacher used this today

W+H+I+S+K+E+Y
23+8+9+19+11+5+25 = 100%

image

bobbycaputo:

Deep in the Heart of Texas

Austin-based photographer Jeff Wilson is a regular contributor to Texas Monthly. He’s worked for the magazine for over a decade, starting back when he was still employed full-time with the Texas Department of Public Safety as a forensic photographer shooting personal work on the weekends. Wilson pitched a photo story to shoot Texas high school football stadiums, and thus began his relationship with the magazine.

(Continue Reading)

eastlondonprintmakers:

Artist Of The Day - Rhed Fawell

Collage based screenprints by Rhed Fawell will be on display at ELPs members exhibition at Embassy Tea Gallery opening tomorrow! 

East London Printmakers @ Embassy Tea Gallery

Embassy Tea Gallery, 195-205 Union Street, London SE1 0LN

17th – 28th September 10.30 – 6pm
16th September – Private View 6.30 – 9.30pm
26th September – South London Art Map 10.30am – 9.30pm

explore-blog:

Nobel-winning playwright Eugene O’Neill on happiness, hard work, and success – fantastic letter of tough love to his unmotivated teenage son

explore-blog:

Nobel-winning playwright Eugene O’Neill on happiness, hard work, and success – fantastic letter of tough love to his unmotivated teenage son

For [Sesame Street’s] 44th season on the air, Cookie Monster was essentially repurposed into a full-time, walking, talking, googly-eyed vehicle for a set of intensely fashionable ideas about psychology and success. The blue Muppet was now … a “poster child for someone needing to master self-regulation skills.”

For the duration of the new season, Cookie [Monster] lusted after his favorite treat as much as ever. But when it came to acting on his desires, he sang, quite literally, a different tune: “Me want it, but me wait.” In sketch after sketch, song after song, he struggled mightily with self-control, strained to keep his focus on long-term goals, and collected mental strategies to delay gratification.

[…]

As the capacity to delay gratification seems more and more like destiny, we are becoming a culture obsessed with self-regulation.

Which lends a kind of overpowering weight to the question: If self-control is so important, how are we supposed to achieve it?

Social psychologist David DeSteno, who studies such fascinating things as the interplay of good and evil in each of us and the psychology of trust, examines the new emotional science of self-regulation, looking at the implications of the famous “marshmallow test” – one of the 20th century’s most famous psychology experiments, testing how children’s ability to delay gratification correlates with their capacity for success as adults, an  essential component of grit, which we now know is a greater predictor of success than IQ

DeSteno’s full essay is well worth reading.

(via explore-blog)

break out of character for me